BUILDING CAN-DO KIDS

1. Be emphatic.
Continually stop and think about how you’d feel if someone said to you the same things you’re saying to your children.
2. Communicate with respect.
Always consider whether you’re saying things in a way that will make your children more receptive.
3. Be flexible.
Parents want their children to be adaptable, thoughtful, and receptive to new ideas, but they often fail to model these behaviors.
4. Give undivided attention.
Kids feel loved when they know their parents enjoy being with them. Schedule a special time – even if only 15 minutes daily – to give each of your children undivided attention.
5. Accept your kids for who they are.
Your children may not match your expectations, but it’s vital to recognize their innate temperaments. When kids feel appreciated for who they are, they’ll feel more secure reaching out to others and learning how to solve problems.
6. Give kids a chance to contribute.
When we enlist children in helping others, we communicate our faith in their ability to handle a variety of tasks and give them a sense of responsibility.
7. Treat mistake as learning experiences.
Kids whose parents overreact to mistakes tend to avoid taking risks and end up blaming others for their problems.
8. Emphasize your children’s strengths.
Although resilient kids aren’t deterred by failure, they also relish their success. Their sense of accomplishment and pride gives them the confidence to persevere the next time they face a challenge.
9. Let your kids solve problems and make decisions.
One trap that many parents fall into is the tendency to rescue their children too quickly.
10. Discipline to teach.
The true meaning of the word discipline is “to teach.” The ultimate goal is to nurture self-discipline so that your children will act responsibly even when you aren’t around.

- Condensed from Raising Resilient Children

Robert Brooke PH.D
Sam Goldstein PH.D

Earn More with LinkConnector

Earn More with LinkConnector